Shane Warne room where he died was splattered with bloodstains due to frantic CPR


Bloodstains from Shane Warne’s desperate fight for life have been found in the luxury room where the spin king was found dying on Friday, police have revealed.

Warne, 52, was discovered face down on his bed after a suspected heart attack at the exclusive Samujana Villas resort on the Thai island of Koh Samui.

Friend Andrew Neophitou found the leg spinner unresponsive in his room and desperately tried to revive him by performing CPR for 20 minutes.

An emergency response unit arrived to take over and carried on the CPR for another 10-20 minutes, managing to stabilise him long enough to get him into an ambulance.

He was rushed to the nearby Thai International Hospital where medics continued CPR for another five minutes – but Warne couldn’t be revived and he died.

On Saturday Thai police revealed the confronting scene they found in the five-star villa as photographs emerged of their forensic investigation at the scene of the tragedy.

Warne, 52, died of a suspected heart attack at the luxury Samujana Villas resort on the Thai island of Koh Samui on Friday evening

Warne, 52, died of a suspected heart attack at the luxury Samujana Villas resort on the Thai island of Koh Samui on Friday evening

Bloodstains from Shane Warne's desperate fight for life splattered the luxury room where the spin king was found dying on Friday, police have revealed

Bloodstains from Shane Warne’s desperate fight for life splattered the luxury room where the spin king was found dying on Friday, police have revealed

Two pools of blood had stained the carpet at the foot of Warne's bed. Nearby were three blood-stained towels and one blood-stained pillow, with bloodstains also soaking into the mattress. Police said the blood was there as a result of frantic CPR carried out on the cricket legend

Two pools of blood had stained the carpet at the foot of Warne’s bed. Nearby were three blood-stained towels and one blood-stained pillow, with bloodstains also soaking into the mattress. Police said the blood was there as a result of frantic CPR carried out on the cricket legend

Two pools of blood had stained the carpet at the foot of Warne’s bed. Nearby were three blood-stained towels and one blood-stained pillow, with bloodstains also soaking into the mattress. Ambulance crews also found a pool of vomit by the bed.  

However, Pol Maj Gen Satit Polpinit, commander of Surat Thani Provincial Police, said CCTV footage had ruled out any foul play or suspicious circumstances. 

He said the extensive bloodstains at the scene were the result of the prolonged attempts at CPR to try to save the cricket legend’s life.

‘A large amount of blood was found in the room,’ he told Thai newspaper Matichon. ‘When CPR was started, the deceased had coughed up liquid and was bleeding.’  

On Saturday Thai police revealed the confronting scene they found in the five-star villa as photographs emerged of their forensic investigation at the scene of the tragedy

On Saturday Thai police revealed the confronting scene they found in the five-star villa as photographs emerged of their forensic investigation at the scene of the tragedy

However Pol Maj Gen Satit Polpinit, commander of Surat Thani Provincial Police, said CCTV footage had ruled out any foul play or suspicious circumstances

However Pol Maj Gen Satit Polpinit, commander of Surat Thani Provincial Police, said CCTV footage had ruled out any foul play or suspicious circumstances

Police also revealed Warne had recently seen a doctor about chest pains prior to his arrival in Thailand and had been suffering from asthma and heart issues.

Bo Phut police superintendent Yuttana Sirisomba, said Warne’s family had passed on the medical information and said he recently ‘seen a doctor about his heart’. 

Warne’s shattered family now face a battle with Thai red tape to bring the father of three’s body back home to Australia.

Police have ordered his body to be taken to Surat Thani Hospital Forensic Medicine for an autopsy but the family want him returned to Melbourne as soon as possible. 

‘We just really want to get Shane home,’ Mr Neophitou said after meeting Thai police at Bo Phut Police Station on Saturday. 

But Thai authorities are insisting they want to carry out the post-mortem before his remains are released to the family to be flown home.

Thai police have said the body must undergo an autopsy to find the exact cause of death and a report will then be sent to the Australian embassy in Thailand.  

The family of Shane Warne (pictured with former fiancee Elizabeth Hurley) are working to bring his body home to Australia, but Thai authorities want to perform an autopsy before they can close the case

The family of Shane Warne (pictured with former fiancee Elizabeth Hurley) are working to bring his body home to Australia, but Thai authorities want to perform an autopsy before they can close the case

Thai police lieutenant-colonel Chatchawin Nakmusik said he needed the results of the autopsy to close the case before releasing the body.

 ‘I am waiting for the autopsy report. If there is nothing suspicious, then the case is closed,’ he told The Guardian.

‘The family will be responsible to take the body back to their home country.’ 

Australian government officials have now met with Warne’s friends in Koh Samui to discuss bringing his body home to Melbourne.   

Foreign Minister Marise Payne said Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade officials were meeting with Warne’s travel companions on Saturday night and speaking with Thai authorities to arrange bringing his body to Australia.

‘DFAT is working with Thai authorities to confirm arrangements following his passing, assist with his repatriation and provide other assistance on the ground,’ she said.

Australia's Ambassador to Thailand Allan McKinnon is seen outside the Bo Phut police station on Saturday evening in the wake of the cricketing great's shock passing. Thai police say they will send a report on his death to the Australian embassy

Australia’s Ambassador to Thailand Allan McKinnon is seen outside the Bo Phut police station on Saturday evening in the wake of the cricketing great’s shock passing. Thai police say they will send a report on his death to the Australian embassy

The friends Warne was travelling with are seen speaking with police in Koh Samui on Saturday

The friends Warne was travelling with are seen speaking with police in Koh Samui on Saturday

Foreign Minister Marise Payne said department officials were meeting with Warne's travel companions on Saturday night and speaking with Thai authorities to arrange bringing his body to Australia

Foreign Minister Marise Payne said department officials were meeting with Warne’s travel companions on Saturday night and speaking with Thai authorities to arrange bringing his body to Australia

Australian consulate officials have now arrived at Koh Samui to try to cut through the red tape on the family’s behalf. 

The Australian Ambassador Allan McKinnon arrived on the island late on Saturday to try to negotiate a deal with Thai officials to allow the body to be released to the family with the minimum of delay.

An official certificate written in English with the cause of death will have to accompany Warne’s body for it to be brought back to Australia, the Daily Telegraph reported. 

The family are believed to be concerned the process will delay Warne coming home by several days.    

Warne had arrived in Thailand just one night before his death, for a week-long boys’ trip with Mr Neophitou, his website gru Gareth Edwards and John Dopere, general manager of the villas and Ware’s personal friend.

He’d planned to meet friends for a drink at 5pm but when the ever-punctual Warne was 15 minutes late, Mr Neophitou knew something was wrong.

He raised the alarm and moved him off the bed and onto the floor where he started the CPR in a desperate bid to save his mate’s life until help arrived.

Devastated Australians paid their respects to Warne at his statue at the MCG on Saturday - with many paying tribute by leaving beers and cigarettes at the makeshift shrine

Devastated Australians paid their respects to Warne at his statue at the MCG on Saturday – with many paying tribute by leaving beers and cigarettes at the makeshift shrine

Warne (pictured with his good friend Eddie McGuire and Triple M host Mick Molloy) was going on a fitness kick to get 'shredded' at the time of his death

Warne (pictured with his good friend Eddie McGuire and Triple M host Mick Molloy) was going on a fitness kick to get ‘shredded’ at the time of his death 

‘Then an ambulance from the Thai International Hospital arrived and took him there. They did CPR for five minutes, and then he died,’ he said.

Warne’s longtime manager James Erskine had the heartbreaking task of informing his family he had died.  

‘They were going to have a drink at 5pm or go and meet someone to go out and have a drink at 5pm, and Neo knocked on his door at 5.15 because Warnie is always on time,’ he said on a Fox Sport special.

‘And he went in there and said ‘come on, you’re going to be late’ and then realised something was wrong.

‘And he turned him over and gave him CPR and mouth to mouth, which lasted about 20 minutes and then the ambulance came.

‘They took him to the hospital, which was about a 20-minute drive and I got a phone call about 45 minutes later saying he was pronounced dead.’ 

A state funeral has been offered to farewell Warne. He is pictured with Test teammate Ricky Ponting

A state funeral has been offered to farewell Warne. He is pictured with Test teammate Ricky Ponting

A devastated cricket fan is seen at the MCG after the news broke Shane Warne had died. The famous ground's Great Southern Stand will be named after the record-breaking spinner

A devastated cricket fan is seen at the MCG after the news broke Shane Warne had died. The famous ground’s Great Southern Stand will be named after the record-breaking spinner

Erskine told Nine Newspapers that Warne’s children Brooke, Summer and Jackson were ‘shattered by their father’s sudden death, and had been visited by their grandfather, Keith, early on Saturday.  

‘He didn’t drink much. Everyone thinks he’s a big boozer but he’s not a big boozer at all,’ Erskine said. 

‘I sent him a crate of wine, 10 years later it’s still there. He doesn’t drink, never took drugs, ever. He hated drugs so nothing untoward.

‘He was going to do the things he likes doing. He was going to play in one or two poker competitions, play a lot of golf, be with his kids, that was about it; [to] have time to himself.’

Warne’s family have been offered to farewell him in a state funeral. 

The state funeral is set to be held in Melbourne, with a date to be confirmed  in consultation with the Warne family, Cricket Australia and the Victorian Government ‘to ensure it honours Shane’s passing and memory’.

Victorian sports minister Martin Pakula has also announced the Great Southern Stand at the MCG will be renamed the S.K. Warne Stand.

‘Shane was one of our greatest cricketers of all time, one of only a few that could approach the extraordinary achievements of the great Don Bradman. His achievements were the product of his talent, his discipline and passion for the game he loved,’ Mr Morrison said.

‘But Shane was more than this to Australians. Shane was one of our nation’s greatest characters. His humour, his passion, his irreverence, his approachability ensured he was loved by all. Australians loved him. We all did.’

Warne’s father, Keith, was seen looking sombre outside his Black Rock property in Melbourne on Saturday morning.

Warne pictured with his former wife and the mother of his three children, Simone Callahan, in 1995

Warne pictured with his former wife and the mother of his three children, Simone Callahan, in 1995

Warne is chaired from the field by team-mates Andrew Symonds and Matthew Hayden after leading Australia to victory in the fourth Test match against England at the MCG in Melbourne, 2006 - the contest in which he took his 700th wicket

Warne is chaired from the field by team-mates Andrew Symonds and Matthew Hayden after leading Australia to victory in the fourth Test match against England at the MCG in Melbourne, 2006 – the contest in which he took his 700th wicket

His mother Brigitte spoke briefly to the Herald Sun outside the home.

‘We’re just in shock… we’re ok,’ she said. 

Warne’s brother Jason and his nephew Sebastian were later seen visiting the property to comfort his parents. 

His daughter, Brooke, 24, was later seen returning home with partner Alex Heath after spending the day consoling her mother and Warne’s ex-wife Simone. 

Meanwhile, countless cricket fans have paid their respects to Warne, with many leaving beers and canned baked beans at the foot of his statue at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.

Cans of VB, cigarettes, cricket balls, heartfelt letters and even a slice of pizza were all left to honour the bowling legend. 

Others just rested their hand against his statue as they farewelled the man who was a hero to many cricket lovers. 

THE WORLD REACTS TO SHANE WARNE’S DEATH 

* ‘I thought nothing could ever happen to him. He lived more in his life than most people would live in 20.’ – Glenn McGrath

* ‘He has had a turbulent life but a very full life … you just felt, I certainly did, he would go on forever.’ – Mark Taylor

* ‘Shocked, stunned & miserable … there was never a dull moment with you around.’ – Sachin Tendulkar

* ‘I am shocked to the core. This can’t be true.’ – Viv Richards

* ‘We have lost one of the greatest sportsmen of all time!’ – Brian Lara

* ‘The game of cricket was never the same after Shane emerged and it will never be the same now he has gone.’ – Pat Cummins

* ‘He brought such joy to the game and was the greatest spin bowler ever.’ – Mick Jagger

* ‘Heaven will be a lively place now the King has arrived.’ – Michael Vaughan

* ‘Please no ….heartbroken. Already miss ‘The King.’ – Brendon McCullum

* ‘Numb.’ – Adam Gilchrist

* ‘I cannot process the passing of this great of our sport.’ – Virat Kohli

* ‘The man who made spin cool.’ – Virendar Sehwag

* ‘It’s just unfathomable.’ – Mark Waugh

* ‘The RockStar of cricket! Gone too soon.’ – Brett Lee

* ‘Genius player. Grand company. Loyal friend.’ – Russell Crowe

* ‘The biggest superstar of my generation gone.’ – Waqar Younis

* ‘Played hard on field and was one of the first to have a beer with you after.’ – Jacques Kallis

 – Australian Associated Press

Many sporting greats, celebrities and politicians have meanwhile paid their respects to the man who changed the world of cricket.

Top cricket commentator Isa Guha who spent countless matches in the box with Warne tried to fight back tears as she remembered the cricket great. 

‘Just stunned … just loved him,’ she said as she tried to hold back tears. ‘He just did so much for so many people and he was magic,’ she said on Fox Sports.

‘He was magic, watching him on the screen as a cricketer. He made people feel that much taller – ten feet taller.’ 

His former teammates Glenn McGrath and Ricky Ponting shared their own messages to the cricket great.

McGrath said he was ‘absolutely devastated’.

‘Warnie was larger than life,’ he wrote. ‘I thought nothing could ever happen to him. He lived more in his life than most people would live in 20. 

‘He was the ultimate competitor. He thought the game was never lost, that he could turn it around and bring us to victory, which he did so many times. I think he lived his life the same way. There seemed to be never a dull moment.’  

Ponting, 47, met Warne at the age of 15, and credited him for giving him the nickname of Punter.

‘We were teammates for more than a decade, riding all the highs and lows together,’ Ponting said.

‘Through it all he was someone you could always count on, someone who loved his family

‘Someone who would be there for you when you needed him and always put his mates first. The greatest bowler I ever played with or against.’

SHANE WARNE’S GREATEST EIGHT MOMENTS 

COLOMBO COMEBACK, 1992

Before the Gatting ball there was the miracle in Colombo that truly announced Warne on the world stage. Chasing 181 for victory, Sri Lanka were cruising at 2-127. Enter Australia’s spinners. Greg Matthews took 4-37 and Warne snapped up 3-0 in his last 13 balls to win the match for Australia, even though the youngster had the unwanted career figures of 1-335 before being handed the ball. From there, Warne never looked back.

WEST INDIES MAYHEM, 1992-93

The moment most Australian fans realised the talent that had just emerged. After missing the first Test of the series, Warne took 7-52 in the second innings at the MCG to bowl Australia to victory against the might of the West Indies. The success doubles as Warne’s first match on his beloved home ground, where he’d eventually take 56 Test wickets.

THE GATTING BALL, 1993

Warne was the ultimate showman and he couldn’t have scripted it better himself. With his first Test delivery in England, he drifted the ball across the right-hander, had it dip, pitch outside leg, spin enough to beat the bat and claim the top of off-stump. Gatting’s bemused face said it all and from that moment on England were deer in Warne’s headlights.

THE HAT-TRICK, 1994-95

A month after destroying England again with 8-71 in the first Test at the Gabba, Warne claimed his famous hat-trick at the MCG when he removed Phil DeFreitas, Darren Gough and Devon Malcolm in three straight balls. Warne finished the series with 27 wickets at 20.33.

WORLD CUP HEROICS, 1999

Three years after helping engineer a comeback to put Australia into the 1996 decider, Warne was at it again. He took 3-3 from his first three overs after South Africa were in control at 0-48 in pursuit of 214, before coming back late to finish 4-29 in the famous tie. He was then man-of-the-match in the final, taking 4-33 against Pakistan as Australia lifted the trophy.

THE PAKISTAN JOB, 2002

An oft-forgotten example of Warne’s dominance. In one of the most one-sided series in history, Warne took 27 wickets at an average of 12.66. In doing so, he took almost half of the wickets available to him in the series and helped Australia wrap up a Test inside two days in Sharjah.

ONE-MAN BAND, 2005

Australia’s only Ashes loss of Warne’s career should have spelled a low point, but with Glenn McGrath in and out with injury the legspinner truly stepped up. He claimed 40 wickets at 19.92 for the series, the most by an Australian in a five-match Ashes. His ball to bowl Andrew Strauss in front of his pads is arguably better than the Gatting ball 12 years earlier.

700TH WICKET, 2006-07

Warne scripted the perfect ending by announcing he would retire at summer’s end with Australia 3-0 up in the Ashes and himself on 699 wickets ahead of the MCG Boxing Day Test. In the perfect farewell, Warne bowled Strauss to become the first to reach 700 wickets before helping Australia to just the second 5-0 Ashes whitewash in history. Not content with that, he also went past 1000 international wickets in all forms of the game in his SCG swansong.

– Australian Associated Press 

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