Red Cross spends 96 per cent of Black Summer bushfire $242million fund


What happened to THOSE bushfire donations? Red Cross shares how it’s being spent as flooding emergency strikes Australia leaving hundreds of families homeless

  • Red Cross released its Australian Bushfire Report online on Wednesday 
  • More than 96 per cent of $242million Black Summer Bushfire funds spent
  • Less than five per cent has been spent on essential administrative support costs 


More than 96 per cent of the $242million raised by the Red Cross following the Black Summer bushfires has been used to help families rebuild their lives.

The charity released its Australian Bushfire Report on Wednesday revealing $232million has been spent two years since the devastating fires of 2019-20.

More than 24million hectares were burned while 33 people were directly killed by the fires and another 450 from smoke inhalation.

The Red Cross has provided financial assistance to 6,131 people to help cover home repair costs and funeral and hospital fees.

More than 96 per cent of the $242million raised by the Red Cross following the Black Summer bushfires has been used to help families rebuild their lives

More than 96 per cent of the $242million raised by the Red Cross following the Black Summer bushfires has been used to help families rebuild their lives

The charity released its Australian Bushfire Report on Wednesday revealing $232million has been spent two years since the devastating fires of 2019-20

The charity released its Australian Bushfire Report on Wednesday revealing $232million has been spent two years since the devastating fires of 2019-20

Some 46 local government areas have been helped across NSW, Victoria and Queensland. 

Less than five per cent has been spent on essential administrative costs with the bulk of the money spent on helping families. 

The Red Cross has set aside the remainder of the money for ‘longer term recovery’. 

The update comes as the Red Cross raises money to provide support to families hit by the latest flood disaster in NSW and Queensland.

Historic rainfall and flooding has already led to one death and the evacuation of more than 500,000 residents in northeastern NSW.

Another nine people have been killed and tens of thousands of homes left without power as the same storm battered southeast Queensland.  

The Red Cross has launched its Queensland and NSW Floods Appeal on its website. 

‘Donations to the Qld and NSW Floods Appeal will help Red Cross to provide vital humanitarian support to the people and communities affected by the floods,’ the appeal reads. 

Daily Mail Australia contacted the Red Cross for comment. 

Flood waters are mostly easing in NSW but the state is not out of danger yet as the epicentre of the crisis shifts to the Hunter region, after Greater Sydney dodged a bullet.

Less than five per cent has been spent on essential administrative costs with the bulk of the money spent on helping families

Less than five per cent has been spent on essential administrative costs with the bulk of the money spent on helping families

Flood waters are mostly easing in NSW but the state is not out of danger yet as the epicentre of the crisis shifts to the Hunter region, after Greater Sydney dodged a bullet (pictured, Lismore in northeastern NSW)

Flood waters are mostly easing in NSW but the state is not out of danger yet as the epicentre of the crisis shifts to the Hunter region, after Greater Sydney dodged a bullet (pictured, Lismore in northeastern NSW)

Heavy rainfall of up to 200mm hit the Hunter on Friday causing moderate to major flooding of the river system, with Gloucester, 120km north of Newcastle, most at risk.

‘We are not past the danger period yet. The rivers are very high, fast-flowing,’ NSW SES Commissioner Carlene York said.

‘There is a lot of debris and it is very dangerous out there.’ 

SES crews responded to more than 700 calls for assistance overnight on Thursday and 13 flood rescues were conducted.

Bursts of heavy rainfall are forecast on Friday from the Illawarra up to the Hunter, according to the Bureau of Meteorology. 

But while the low pressure system that brought hundreds of millimetres of rain and devastating flooding to multiple areas in NSW this week was easing on Friday, more bad weather is expected this weekend.

‘We’re looking at widespread shower and thunderstorm activity developing across much of eastern NSW from the Mid-North Coast all the way down to the Victorian border, and extending inland on Sunday and Monday,’ the BoM’s Dean Narramore said.

Heavy rainfall of up to 200mm hit the Hunter on Friday causing moderate to major flooding of the river system, with Gloucester, 120km north of Newcastle, most at risk (pictured, Lismore)

Heavy rainfall of up to 200mm hit the Hunter on Friday causing moderate to major flooding of the river system, with Gloucester, 120km north of Newcastle, most at risk (pictured, Lismore)

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