Inside Jarryd Hayne's first days behind bars at Parklea prison  

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Rapist Jarryd Hayne has begun his life behind bars with a strip search at the maximum-security Parklea Correctional Centre in Sydney’s north-west. 

Hayne arrived at the privately-run prison on Thursday night to begin the process which will eventually see him transferred to another jail to serve out his sentence.

The strip search was followed by a shower and the two-time Dally M Medal winner was issued with bottle-green clothing, bedding and basic toiletries.

After being convicted of the aggravated sexual assault of a woman at her Newcastle home in 2018, Hayne will now disappear into the NSW prison system for almost four years. 

His new neighbours include killers, other rapists, bikies and paedophiles. Accused murderer Dennis Pietrobon took his own life last month at Parklea. 

Rapist Jarryd Hayne has begun his life behind bars with a strip search at the maximum-security Parklea Correctional Centre in Sydney's north-west. He is pictured reporting for bail at Woy Woy police station ahead of being jailed for a minimum three years and eight months

Rapist Jarryd Hayne has begun his life behind bars with a strip search at the maximum-security Parklea Correctional Centre in Sydney’s north-west. He is pictured reporting for bail at Woy Woy police station ahead of being jailed for a minimum three years and eight months

Hayne arrived at the privately-run prison on Thursday night to begin the process which will eventually see him transferred to another jail to serve out his sentence. Officers are pictured searching inmates at Parklea Correctional Centre in October 2015

Hayne arrived at the privately-run prison on Thursday night to begin the process which will eventually see him transferred to another jail to serve out his sentence. Officers are pictured searching inmates at Parklea Correctional Centre in October 2015

Hayne was given a six-digit Master Index Number known as a MIN which he was told to memorise. It will become his new identity and accompany him for the rest of his time in custody. Inmates are pictured at a muster in Hunter Correctional Centre

Hayne was given a six-digit Master Index Number known as a MIN which he was told to memorise. It will become his new identity and accompany him for the rest of his time in custody. Inmates are pictured at a muster in Hunter Correctional Centre

Wife Amellia Bonnici and their four-year-old daughter Beliviah Ivy will be able to visit but it could be up to five years and nine months before Hayne spends another night with them.  

Upon arrival at the jail’s reception area the one time State of Origin stalwart was photographed and asked a series of questions to ensure his health, welfare and safety. 

The 33-year-old’s personal property was listed and stored away until his release. Any cash he was carrying was put in a private account.

As part of the initial screening process Hayne was asked if he had any particular problems then allowed to make a phone call to a family member or friend.  

He was assessed for any need for services and programs such as those offered to convicted sex offenders. He was also assessed for any self-harm risk.

Hayne was given a six-digit Master Index Number known as a MIN which he was told to memorise. It will become his new identity and accompany him for the rest of his time in custody. 

The MIN appears on an identity card Hayne was issued which he will have to carry everywhere. If he loses the card he will have to pay for a replacement. 

As part of the initial screening process Hayne was asked if he had any particular problems then allowed to make a phone call to a family member or friend. An immate is pictured at the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Centre at Silverwater

As part of the initial screening process Hayne was asked if he had any particular problems then allowed to make a phone call to a family member or friend. An immate is pictured at the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Centre at Silverwater

Upon arrival at the jail's reception area the one time State of Origin stalwart was photographed and asked a series of questions to ensure his health, welfare and safety. Once placed in a cell Hayne had access to an alarm, known as a knock-up button, in case of any emergency.

Upon arrival at the jail’s reception area the one time State of Origin stalwart was photographed and asked a series of questions to ensure his health, welfare and safety. Once placed in a cell Hayne had access to an alarm, known as a knock-up button, in case of any emergency.

A nurse asked about Hayne’s medical circumstances and he was likely given an induction handbook which set out the conditions in custody at Parklea.

The biggest changes to Hayne’s once-privileged world will most likely be intangible: loss of freedom, separation from loved ones and fear about prison life. 

A chapter titled ‘Going To Prison’ in The Families Handbook published by the NSW Department of Justice explains how fresh inmates react to their first nights inside. 

‘The early days and weeks can be the hardest,’ it states. ‘Many prisoners feel depressed, anxious and fearful during this time. 

‘Correctional centres can be tough places, and, while the levels of violence have decreased in recent years, bullying still does occur. 

‘Many prisoners feel that showing sadness, fear or distress may make them appear “weak”. Some prisoners try to act “tough” so they won’t be seen as vulnerable.

‘Others try to stay safe by withdrawing and keeping a low profile.’

The biggest changes to Hayne's once-privileged world will most likely be intangible: loss of freedom, separation from loved ones and fear about prison life. Officers are pictured searching Parklea prison for drugs, weapons and phones in July 2017

The biggest changes to Hayne’s once-privileged world will most likely be intangible: loss of freedom, separation from loved ones and fear about prison life. Officers are pictured searching Parklea prison for drugs, weapons and phones in July 2017

During the screening process Hayne was asked if he had any concerns for his safety due to the nature of his offences or fears of any particular inmates. 

Hayne may ask to be placed on protection, or prison authorities may make that decision for him if they feel he is unsafe.  

‘Although protection may offer prisoners a safer environment, the decision to go on protection should not be taken lightly,’ The Families Handbook states.

Other inmates can be suspicious or antagonistic towards prisoners who have been on protection and it can be dangerous returning to the mainstream population.  

Sexual assaults do not occur as often as portrayed in popular culture and most inmates can avoid violence if they keep a low profile and steer clear of ‘prison politics’. 

Once placed in a cell Hayne had access to an alarm, known as a knock-up button, in case of any emergency. 

A strip search was followed by a shower and the two-time Dally M Medal winner was issued with bottle-green clothing, bedding and basic toiletries. Image from the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Centre at Parklea

A strip search was followed by a shower and the two-time Dally M Medal winner was issued with bottle-green clothing, bedding and basic toiletries. Image from the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Centre at Parklea

He won’t need a Medicare card. If he feels unwell a registered nurse is available and most health services provided at the jail’s medical clinic are free. 

Hayne can wear a wedding ring or watch worth $50 or less and all his belongings must fit in two tubs. 

He will be offered testing for HIV and hepatitis. Condoms are available in his wing.

In future Hayne will be able to make paid calls to a limited number of people recorded in the Offender Telephone System. There is no limit to the amount of calls that can be made but most conversations are capped at six minutes. 

Private calls can be recorded and legal calls monitored. When Hayne makes a call the person answering will hear a message saying, ‘This is a call from an inmate at Parklea Correctional Centre.’

Hayne's new neighbours include killers, other rapists, bikies and paedophiles. Accused murderer Dennis Pietrobon took his own life last month at Parklea. Officers remove inmates from their cells at Parklea prison in 2017

Hayne’s new neighbours include killers, other rapists, bikies and paedophiles. Accused murderer Dennis Pietrobon took his own life last month at Parklea. Officers remove inmates from their cells at Parklea prison in 2017

Hayne can purchase approved items from the canteen – known as ‘buy-ups’ – but the quantity will be determined by factors including the size of his cell. 

Buy-ups include drinks, biscuits, sweets, cake mixes, noodles, sauces, tinned food, personal hygiene items, vitamins and dietary supplements and can be purchased each week. 

In his cell Hayne can keep Corrective Services-issued clothing, buy-up items, education and hobby/craft materials, medication and approved religious items.

The Pentecostal Christian can see a chaplain and attend religious services. 

Outside deposits can be made into his inmate account at an Australia Post outlet or online using BPAY but a $100 limit for each transaction applies.

Hayne will likely have access to a television and perhaps newspapers. He will not be allowed to have pornographic magazines.

As part of the initial screening process Hayne was asked if he had any particular problems then allowed to make a phone call to a family member or friend. He was issued clothes and toiletries

As part of the initial screening process Hayne was asked if he had any particular problems then allowed to make a phone call to a family member or friend. He was issued clothes and toiletries

He will probably be able to play sports such as touch football and basketball later in his sentence and will have the use of a gym. 

Hayne will be fed three times a day and eat in his cell. At some point he may be able to buy a sandwich maker or rice cooker for his personal use.

While at Parklea Hayne will get a security classification which will determine the prison in which he will ultimately be placed. He will ask the location of his family to be taken into account before that decision is made. 

Sentenced prisoners are expected to work. Hayne may be employed in prison services such as cleaning and food preparation or on commercial projects for Corrective Services Industries. 

Hayne will be allowed up to four adults and four children to visit it at any one time while at Parklea. Two one-hour visits are permitted per week.  

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