Boy designs deodorant roller for his friend suffering from disability


Boy, 13, designs deodorant roll holder so his friend who was born with shorter arms can reach his armpits without help

  • Matty Dunn has a rare blood disorder that makes his arms shorter than average
  • The 11-year-old struggles to reach his underarms to put on deodorant 
  • His friend Murphy Mansfiel made a deodorant holder that can be easily used 
  • Murphy used a 3D printer to create a plastic holder for Matty’s deodorant roller

A 13-year-old boy has designed a specialised deodorant roller for his friend who suffers from a disability that makes his limbs too short to use a normal can.

Matty Dunn, from Burnie in Tasmania, has a rare blood disorder that makes his arms shorter than average, making everyday tasks difficult.

The 11-year-old manages to get ready for school in the morning without too much help from his parents but he struggles to reach his underarms to put on deodorant.

Matty Dunn (left) has a rare blood disorder that makes his arms shorter than average, causing him difficulty performing everyday tasks. His friend Murphy Mansfield created a deodorant for him to use

Matty Dunn (left) has a rare blood disorder that makes his arms shorter than average, causing him difficulty performing everyday tasks. His friend Murphy Mansfield created a deodorant for him to use 

Matty’s friend Murphy Mansfield had an idea to create a deodorant holder that can be maneuver the roller to compensate for his shorter arms.

‘I just wanted to help and make it easier for people,’ Murphy, 13, told the ABC.

Murphy and his teachers at Montello Primary School used a 3D printer to create a plastic holder for Matty’s deodorant roller.

The contraption works by putting a deodorant stick in the hole, then holding onto the length of plastic to reach under his arms. 

‘It helps me a lot. It actually helps me very much,’ Matty said. ‘Now I can use it [under my arms].’  

‘He’s been my friend for a long time, so he’ll be my friend for ever and ever. What I love about him is he’s kind and very caring.’ 

The two boys met through the Young Leaders of Tasmania buddy program, which brings together kids from mainstream schools and students with disabilities.

‘It was just an amazing outcome where we witnessed throughout the course of the full year them getting to know each other, having fun and learning about each other’s schools,’ program worker Keren Franks said.

Murphy and his teachers at Montello Primary School used a 3D printer to create a plastic holder for Matty's deodorant roller

Murphy and his teachers at Montello Primary School used a 3D printer to create a plastic holder for Matty’s deodorant roller

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.